Chennai, 2020
The journey of exploring alternate materials from common Indian kitchen wastes yielding a wide range of papers from natural materials with a variety colours and textures. In a world of rapid production and depletion of resources, can wastes become new raw materials? Can circular systems begin at home? In a quest for answers...

Surfaces made with old and dry curry leaves, flowers, sweet lime peels, betel leaves, carrot peels, radish peels & mint stalks 
The first few batches started with recycling newspaper and waste copier sheets with the addition of wilted flower petals as embellishments. The challenge was also to find the right balance of water to pulp that would give a perfectly circular paper. All explorations were made with a sieve as a deckle and a mixer to make the pulp.
Changing each factor in the entire process yielded different results. Further explorations with different materials to transfer the paper onto while drying resulted in different textures. Methods of drying also played a role in the variety of qualities of material. Creating a range of thicknesses by controlling the amount of pulp in the colloidal solution was a repetitive process involving different senses.  
Old betel leaves
Old betel leaves
Radish peels
Radish peels
Mint stalks
Mint stalks

Paper from radish peels | Texture obtained by drying on newspaper

Carrot peels
Carrot peels
Flower petals
Flower petals
Curry leaves
Curry leaves
Failed results were a big part of the process
Sweet lime peels
Sweet lime peels
Banana stem fibre on the sieve
Banana stem fibre on the sieve
Natural colour pallete from curry leaves, banana fibre and sweetlime peels
Natural colour pallete from curry leaves, banana fibre and sweetlime peels
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